September 25, 2021

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YouTube condemns covert fake news campaign against Pfizer vaccine

Influencers who received a call from a marketing agency to spread misinformation about the Covit-19 vaccine condemned the attempt to recruit them (Photo: BBC)

Asinathura BBC Topo (Photo: BBC)

A marketing company paid to spread misinformation to social media influencers around the world Vaccines Against Govt-19.

Among them, a Brazilian YouTuber.

Everson Joey, who is known for his extraordinary challenges such as putting his hand on an ant, posted a video on his Instagram that raised doubts about the safety of Pfizer’s vaccine. The video was deleted when the story came to light. He did not respond to BBC requests for comment (see below).

On the other hand, some influencers who received the invitation of the marketing company condemned the attempt to include them.

“It all started with an email.

Drachman generally ignores the offers of brands that ask him to advertise products to his more than 1.5 million followers. But the sponsorship offer he received in May this year was nothing else.

An agency called FOS asked him if information had been leaked suggesting that the mortality rate among people receiving the FIS vaccine was almost three times higher than that of AstraZeneca.

The information provided is not true.

It was soon revealed that he had been asked by Trochman to spread misinformation in order to undermine public confidence in vaccines in the midst of an epidemic.

Mirko Trotsman was paid to spread false information on his social media accounts (and turned down the offer) (Photo: Mirko Trotsman)

Mirco Trotsman was paid to spread false information on his social media accounts (and turned down the offer) (Photo: Mirko Trotsman)

“I was shocked,” he says. “Then I was curious: ‘What’s behind all this?’

In France, science YouTuber Leo Crossett received a similar offer. The company offered 2,000 euros (approximately R12,200) for participation, saying it would work for a customer who wants to remain anonymous.

“It’s a big clue that something went wrong,” Crossett says.

Crosset and Trotsman were hated by the false accusations.

They pretended to be interested in trying to learn more and were given detailed instructions on what to say in their videos.

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In unnatural English, the summary instructed them to act “as you are interested and interested in this topic”.

It said not to mention that there was a sponsor for the video and that they had to pretend that they were giving advice arbitrarily out of concern for the audience.

There are rules that do not disclose whether content is sponsored on social media sites. It is illegal in France and Germany.

Foss’s instructions called on influencers to share a story in the French newspaper Le Monte about a data leak from a European pharmaceutical company.

Out of context data
The story is true, but it does not talk about vaccine deaths. In that context, however, it would give the false impression that the death rate figures came from a leak.

Leo Crochet was horrified by the attempt to appoint him (Photo: Leo Croset)

Leo Crochet was horrified by the attempt to appoint him (Photo: Leo Croset)

The data asked to be shared with influencers is actually a mix of different sources prepared and taken from the environment.

“Information” used the number of deaths in different countries after receiving different vaccines against Govt-19. But just because someone died after being vaccinated does not mean they died after they were vaccinated. For example, he may have died in a car accident.

In the countries where the statistics came from, more people were getting the Pfizer vaccine at that time, so it was expected that more people would die after the Pfizer vaccine.

“If you don’t have science training, you can say, ‘Oh, these numbers are really different. So there has to be a connection.’ You can make any bad connection you want, ” Crossett said.

Also provided is a list of links to share with influencers: Suspicious articles that everyone has used in the set of numbers that the Pfizer vaccine is said to be dangerous.

When Crossett and Trotsman exposed the Facebook campaign on Twitter, all articles except the Le Monde report disappeared from the Internet.

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Since the announcement of the Crossett and Trotschman call, at least four influencers from France and Germany have publicly stated that they reject Foss’s attempts to appoint them.

‘Unfair’
But German journalist Daniel Laufer identified two influences that accepted the offer.

First of all, Ashkar Tekki, an Indian YouTuber who often makes funny videos about cars and dating. Second, the Brazilian Everson Soyo. He has more than 3 million followers on Instagram, where the video about Pfizer was released and has 12.8 million on YouTube.

YouTube Everson Joyo warns his followers about Pfizer's vaccine and later deleted from his Instagram account (Photo: Everson Joyo)

YouTube Everson Joyo warns his followers about Pfizer’s vaccine and later deleted from his Instagram account (Photo: Everson Joyo)

The two released unusual videos in which they revealed the same message of the Face campaign, as well as sharing fake news links that were in the company’s instructions. Both have participated in previous Boss commercials.

The BBC approached the video that Joey posted on his Instagram. He gets in a car, looks at the camera and reads the memorized text: “Guys, I’m making this video here to share some information I have about the vaccine, you know?”, He begins.

“There are some things that make me think so much, I was looking at some articles and I found something that really worries me,” he says. Later, he claims to have found data on the mortality rate of those vaccinated by Pfizer, which is “three times higher than AstraZeneca”.

“I don’t understand why this vaccine is still being bought in so many countries,” he says. “This is unfair and very worrying, don’t you agree? We need to know ourselves well because in the end we are the ones who benefit or harm from all of this.”

At the end of the video of more than a minute, he asks followers to access a link in his profile biography.

After Daniel Lauer contacted them, Everson Soyo and Ashkar Deci removed their videos but did not answer their questions. The BBC tried to contact the two influencers, but they did not respond.

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Russian links?
The BBC also sought to send emails to those who approached Trotsman and Crossett. The emails came back – not from Foss, but from the domain of a company called Atnov.

FOS is part of Adno, a digital marketing company registered in Russia and the UK.

Indian Ashkar Techie shares suspicious data in his video (Photo: Ashkar Techie)

Indian Ashkar Techie shares suspicious data in his video (Photo: Ashkar Techie)

The BBC made several attempts to contact Adno by phone, email and letter sent to its Moscow headquarters, but they did not respond.

Finally, I was able to contact Evan Tollade, one of the two directors of the British division of the BBC Adno.

Dolade said he had very little contact with Boss – a joint venture between its director, Stanislav Fesenko, a Russian – and someone he did not know.

He said he did not participate in the misinformation. He said he did not even know Foss had taken the deal before the story broke. He could not clarify who the mystery shopkeeper was.

In light of the scandal, he said, “We are doing a responsible thing and shut down AdNow in the UK.” He said the pass would also be closed.

The BBC tried to persuade Fesenko to speak up, but it failed.

French and German officials began investigating Bass’ attitudes toward influencers.

But the identity of the agency’s mysterious client is not clear.

There are speculations about Russian ties to this scandal and the interests of the Russian government in promoting its own vaccine – Sputnik Vs.

Omid Nouripur, foreign policy spokesman for the German Green Party, suggested seeing Moscow for the motivation behind the PAS campaign.

“Bad talk about vaccines in the West is said to undermine confidence in our democracy and increase confidence in Russia’s vaccines. The only way to benefit from this is by the Kremlin,” he said.

But in a statement, the Russian embassy in London said: “We see Kovit-19 as a global threat, so we are not interested in undermining global efforts in the fight against it. Deal with the virus.”

Despite the failure of the Boss’ campaign, Leo Crossett believes that this will not be the last attempt to spread misinformation about the power of social influence.

“If you want to manipulate public opinion, especially young people, don’t go on TV,” says Crossett.

“Spend the same money on influencers on TicTac and YouTube. The whole ecosystem is structured for maximum misinformation capacity.”

BBC Footer (Photo: BBC)