December 4, 2021

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Voting ends in important parliamentary elections for Alberto Fernandez’s government in Argentina | The world

Voters cast their ballots for the by-elections this Sunday (14) Argentina – The vote for the government of center-left Alberto Fernandez is very important.

In the primary elections held in September, Fernandez’s ally, Frende de Todos, lost to the opposition as a sign of what the outcome would be this Sunday.

If the opposition dominates the legislature, the ruling power for the next 2 years will be affected.

Christina Kirschner and Alberto Fernandez on November 11, 2021 – Photo: Matias Baglietto / Reuters

“We ended a good election day. Everything went smoothly. According to the first data from the National Electoral Room, the turnout was 71 to 72%. There were more people than in the first phase in September,” the home minister said. Wado de Pedro, shortly after polling stations closed at 18:00 local time (the same time in Brasilia).

De Pedro confirmed that the first results of the ballot would be announced at 21:00. Polls are prohibited.

Cities around Buenos Aires

After the government’s setback in the September primaries, Buenos Aires ’perimeter of population, with nearly 40% on the voter list, remains the historic stronghold of the ruling Peronist Party. The capital and other major cities are in the hands of the opposition.

Of the 257 seats in the House of Representatives, 127 will be renewed, with the ruling Frente de Totos as the first minority.

The government has the most dangerous dispute in the Senate, led by influential Vice President Christina Kirschner, where 24 of the 72 seats will be renewed.. In the Upper Chamber, Fernandez’s government is holding its 41 senators hostage, with 25 from the center – right coalition, Together for Change, led by former President Mauricio Macri.

Argentina Senate Virtual Session Photo May 13 – Photo: Augustine Margarian / Archivo / Reuters

The September primary exams are considered a major survey across the country. In that referendum, the ruling Frende de Todos coalition lost by 33% of the vote, with 37% against the change.

While all the candidates are already thinking about the 2023 presidential race, Fernandez is trying to secure power for the next two years of his term.

Macri, a key figure in the opposition, said “the next two years will be tough” and assured that in a successful tone, his coalition will “work with great responsibility to help bring about change as orderly as possible.”

In recent weeks, the government has announced economic measures and price controls in an effort to combat rising inflation, which accumulated to 41.8% between January and October, one of the highest in the world.

Fernandez has tightened his grip on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as Argentina seeks to reach an agreement to convert $ 44 billion in stand-by loan to 2018.

“We have to settle the debt they left in the IMF, of course we have to settle it. But I will not solve it in five minutes because whoever solves this problem in five minutes he has agreed to fund everything. He is asking,” he said. Fernandez at the end of the campaign.

Without the new agreement, Argentina – 40% of its population living in poverty – will have to pay $ 19 billion to the IMF in 2022 and the same amount in 2023.

When will the election take place The country is emerging from the last recession that began in 2018 and is deepened by a 9.9% drop in GDP by 2020 due to the Govt-19 epidemic..

The decline in the number of Govt-19 infections in recent weeks and the improvement of the vaccination program – with more than 60% of the population having a complete vaccination schedule and another 20% of the first dose – allow operations to be restarted and restored. .

But a growth of nearly 9% in this year’s GDP forecast brings the situation back to the start of the Fernandez government, which had accumulated two years of recession in Argentina.

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