December 4, 2021

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Archaeologists have unearthed more than 1,000 years of the remains of 29 people in Peru; See Photos World

A team of archaeologists discovered it north Peru Remains of 29 people, including three children, who can help experts rewrite the history of the pre-Inca Wari civilization.

1,000-year-old skeletons have been found in the Huasa Santa Rosa de Bucala, an ancient ritual center on the Lombayek coast, 750 kilometers north of Lima.

The burial of the three children and a young man in front of the temple are evidence that they are the human sacrifices of the Wari culture, said Edgar Brigamonde, chairman of the team of scientists.

This is the first time that an invention related to the Wari civilization has been discovered so far from its main influence.

“These findings allow us to revisit the history of the Lombay region, especially the connections with the Wari and Mochica occupations in the region,” said Prakamonde.

Photo courtesy of Symphony’s Royal Tombs Museum, Lombayek, shows a site with 29 relics found at the archeological site – Photo: AFP

Water culture flourished in the central Peruvian Andes between the 7th and 13th centuries. The burial place, in the letter ‘D’, was built in the 9th century.

“We found a ritual temple with 29 rituals, 25 of which are from the Mochica era and four-part culture,” said Prakamonde.

Mochica, or Moche, culture grew on the northern coast of Peru from 100 to 700 AD.

Photo courtesy of Symphony’s Royal Tombs Museum, Lombayek, shows a site with 29 relics found at the archeological site – Photo: AFP

25 Mochica remains were found in clay tombs and burial chambers in a temple. Researchers also found pottery and camel remains – llamas and albacos – and guinea pigs.

One of the most important discoveries related to the Mochica culture took place in 2006, with the discovery of the 5th century mummy by Dama de Cav, evidence that civilization sometimes had female leaders.

Photo published by the Royal Tombs Museum of Symphony shows one of the 29 remains found in the archeological site of Lombayek, Peru – Photo: AFP

The discovery of another mummy in 1987 by the 3rd-century Siban lord is considered by experts to be one of the most important archaeological discoveries of recent decades, as the main tomb remained untouched by thieves.

Photo published by the Royal Tombs Museum of Symphony shows some of the 29 remains found in the Lombayek Archaeological Site of Peru – Photo: AFP

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