September 25, 2021

The Indie Toaster

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Another major hurricane brings waves up to 15 meters in the Atlantic

NOAA

A week later Catastrophic hurricane Ida Der Attacked the United States, Another severe hurricane (Types 3 to 5) is active in the North Atlantic. That’s Larry. The good news is that, unlike Ida, the truck is in the open water far away from the beach and should not pose a danger to densely populated areas. However, the storm is expected to pass dangerously near Bermuda.

Larry is currently a Type 3 hurricane and is expected to increase to Type 4 earlier this week. This Sunday afternoon, the hurricane was at 20.1 N and 50.2 W with winds lasting approximately 180 km / h and a minimum central atmospheric pressure of 955 hPa.

The structure of the storm throughout this weekend caught the attention of meteorologists, with a very focused and well-defined eye at various times. Part of this Sunday’s eye wall is less organized with a larger cut pattern.

The storm is predicted to create large swells with large waves that will hit the laser Antilles and then spread to the western Antilles, the Bahamas and Bermuda.

Significant waves will hit the east coast of the United States during the week and even numerical samples indicate that the truck’s swelling will reach the coasts of Barre, Amabe and Maranhou in Brazil.

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The models indicate waves up to 15 meters near the center of the storm, but we emphasize that if the north coast of Brazil is blown, the sea level will not be significant compared to other areas.

The 2021 Atlantic hurricane season has already generated 38 named storm days. September 4: 1995, 1996, 2005, 2008, 2012 and 2020 were named storm days with only six years to the age of the satellites (since 1966).

Larry 2021 is the third severe hurricane of the Atlantic season. September 4: As of 1933, 2005 and 2008 there were 3 hurricanes with a maximum speed of 200 kmph in only three Atlantic seasons.

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