July 31, 2021

The Indie Toaster

Complete News World

Americans ‘Junetin’, which marks the end of slavery in the United States, is now celebrating a national holiday | The world

Americans are celebrating this Saturday (19), for the first time as a national holiday, “Junettin”. This date marks the last liberation of enslaved Texas in 1865 and is widely remembered in the country as a symbol of anti-racist movements.

Thursday (17), Chairman United States, Joe Biden, Signed into law a law that made July 19 a national holiday, Presented by the U.S. Congress and unanimously approved by Democratic and Republican senators.

“Junetin” was already considered a holiday in some states across the country – but with the support of the Black Lives Matter movement, the pressure to pass a federal law has increased since the assassination of former black security guard George Floyd.

Day for the Abolition of Slavery will become a holiday in the United States

Day for the Abolition of Slavery will become a holiday in the United States

A series of demonstrations and tributes are set to take place this Saturday in various parts of the country.

In New York, a monument to George Floyd was erected – and this Junett opened near Brooklyn, which had a strong presence in the black community.

Floyd’s assassination sparked a series of anti-racist protests and police violence over the past year.

Protesters pay tribute to George Floyd’s memorial in New York this June 19, June 19 Photo – Photo: Gina Moon / Reuters

“Junettin” is an anthology in English dated June 19 (June 19). The day the last slaves in the country received the information that they were free – more than 150 years.

On January 1, 1863, then – President Abraham Lincoln signed the Declaration of Independence and ordered the end of slavery (approximately two and a half years from June 19, 1865).

However, during the American Civil War (1861-1865), the Southern Confederacy maintained the rule of slavery – which was also a factor in the war.

Confederation President Robert Lee signed his surrender on April 9, 1865, but it took more than two months for the news to reach Calveston, a small town in Texas on June 19.

The Junetine flag was flown in Omaha, Nebraska on Friday (19) – Photo: AP Photo / Natty Hornick

READ  'Havana Syndrome'? Mystery disease affects US diplomats in Vienna